The Hannon Library will host a book sale this week, from May 25th-May 27th. Hours on the 25th and 26th are 8am-7pm, and hours on the 27th are 8am-5pm. Hardcovers are $2, paperbacks are $1. Cash and credit cards are accepted, and there will be new stock daily. For any questions, please contact 541-552-6023 or libraryevents@sou.edu.

 

To celebrate AAPI Heritage Month, we interviewed SOU Associate Professor and Author Precious Yamaguchi, Ph.D, about her work, as well as some of her favorite books by AAPI authors. 

 

What is your favorite thing about being a professor at SOU?

“I think the students at SOU are so unique, fun, and I love getting to know the students individually and as a class when we start building our learning community together throughout the quarter.”

 

What was the experience of researching and writing your novel, Experiences of Japanese American Women during and after World War II: Living in Internment Camps and Rebuilding Life Afterwards, like?

“It took me nearly eight years to write this book and I interviewed 16 Japanese American individuals who were in their 70s, 80s, and 90s – all of these individuals had experienced imprisonment in the World War II Japanese American internment camps. I had to be both patient and diligent in writing this book. I had to be patient because I needed each of these individuals to gain my trust in telling their story, so I met with many of these individuals numerous times. I also had to be diligent in my writing because many of them were passing away since some of them were in their 80s and 90s. I wanted them to read and see the finished outcome of their stories included in my book. This book was also personal for me since all of my grandparents were imprisoned in the internment camps when they were teenagers.”

 

What are some of your favorite books written by or about members of the AAPI community?

“I have a lot of favorite books by members of the AAPI community, my recent favorites are Jackson Bliss’s Counterfactual Love Stories and Other Experiments (Jackson Bliss is a hapa writer, meaning mixed Japanese American) and Jo Koy’s Mixed Plate. I used to work for an Asian American magazine a long time ago and our organization was also an Asian American talent agency and we helped Jo Koy get his start as a comedian. I also enjoy more academic-type AAPI writers such as Radhika Gajjala and her book Digital Diasporas, Margaret Rhee’s Love, Robot, and Michelle Zauner’s Crying in H Mart is so good!”

Join the Friends of Hannon Library this Thursday at 5pm for the latest installment in the Speaker Series: Storytelling: Stepping from the Past to the Future with Indigenous Fantasy. Pre-Registration is required and can be done here.

Valerie Janis, Ojibwe author and librarian, shares the creative process of entwining her traditional culture and the Ojibwe and Lakota languages with the supernatural and mythical beasts.

A new deal negotiated by the Hannon Library will allow all students, staff, and faculty to access to the online version of the New York Times. Collection Development Librarian, Emily Miller-Francisco, negotiated the deal on behalf of the library.

SOU’s institutional subscription includes the following:

  • Unlimited access on NYTimes.com (There is no daily limit to the number of articles you can download)
  • Archives (dating back to 1851)  timesmachine.nytimes.com/browser (5 PDF article downloads from Times Machine per user per day/100 per month)
  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality – found in the App; NYT stories told through enhanced technology
  • Daily 360 content – two dimensional, 360° views (with mobile device or using a mouse)
  • Podcasts (including The “Daily” podcast)
  • All multimedia, including video, photography, VR features, and new multimedia to come
  • Newsletters (there are a variety of topics that you may subscribe to)
  • Spanish and Mandarin Chinese versions of NYTimes.com
  • Unlimited access to two great learning tools: The New York Times inEducation website and The Learning Network. (nytimesineducation.com and nytimes.com/learning)

Those interested can access the New York Times on campus without a paywall. To access the paper off campus, or use The NY Times app, you’ll need to set up an account. If you are currently paying for a subscription that is linked to your SOU email, you have to first cancel your subscription.  Once registered, students will have access until 12/31 of their graduation year; faculty and staff will have four years of account access, after which they must re-authenticate by visiting accessnyt.com.

More information can be found in the library’s A-Z list of databases on our website. The Hannon Library is always happy to provide assistance and answer any questions that may arise while users navigate their subscription.

The Hannon Library is celebrating and honoring six women from historically marginalized and underrepresented groups this Women’s History Month. These women have shaped the history books in myriad of ways––even if said books haven’t give them their due credit.

A display in the library is featured until the end of the month, highlighting Ida B. Wells, Patsy Mink, Dolores Huerta, Billie Jean King, Agnes Baker Pilgrim, and Henrietta Lacks. While each has her own story to tell, these women have all fought for the rights and liberation of women. By highlighting BIPOC and LGBT+ women this March, the library hopes to bring attention and awareness to the issues that have historically––and are still currently––affecting marginalized women.

Resources and information about these women have been curated and are featured in our Women’s History Month display, which is located in the library, across from the tutoring center. Books and other materials are available for checkout for those interested in learning more about these visionary, incredible women. A virtual exhibit, created by Student Special Collections Outreach Assistant Julia Saunders, is also available for viewing here.