AAPI Book Covers

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Hannon Library’s faculty and staff members have curated books and e-books written by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders covering various genres and topics, including titles written specifically about Asian Americans’ and Pacific Islanders’ heritages and experiences.

We’ve highlighted 20 books below, but you can check out our Twitter, Instagram and Facebook pages for more recommendations all month long.

1. Asianfail: Narratives of Disenchantment and the Model Minority by Eleanor Ty

According to the Journal of Asian American Studies, “Eleanor Ty’s book Asianfail is a valuable and timely contribution to Asian American and Asian Canadian studies, providing a novel way of understanding the new generation of Asian North Americans through their narratives.”

Book Cover of Asianfail: Narratives of Disenchantment and the Model Minority

Hannon Library provides access to the e-book version of Asianfail. Check it out here.

2. Burnt Sugar by Avni Doshi

Avni Doshi’s debut novel, Burnt Sugar, was shortlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize and has recently been added to the longlist for the 2021 Women’s Prize for Fiction.

Cover of Burnt Sugar

Check out the print version here.

3. Days of Distraction by Alexandra Chang

According to The Washington Post, Alexandra Chang’s debut novel “brims with the predicaments of our current moment: institutional racism, xenophobia, white privilege, microaggressions, institutional sexism, the tech gender gap, social media activism, neoliberal hypocrisy, coastal myopia and millennial resentment, to name a few.”

Cover of Days of Distraction

Check out the print version here.

4. DMZ Colony by Don Mee Choi

Don Mee Choi’s DMZ Colony recently won the 2020 National Book Award for Poetry.

Book Cover of DMZ Colony

Check out the print version here.

5. Experiences of Japanese American Women During and After World War II: Living in Internment Camps and Rebuilding Life Afterwards by Precious Yamaguchi

Published by Lexington Books in 2015 and written by SOU’s very own Dr. Precious Yamaguchi, you can find this title on the second floor of Hannon Library.

Book Cover of Experiences of Japanese American women during and after World War II: Living in Internment Camps and Rebuilding Life Afterwards

Check out the print version here.

6. Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations by Mira Jacob

In 2019, Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations was named one of the year’s best books by The New York Times Book Review. 

Book Cover of Good Talk A Memoir in Conversations

Check out the print version here.

7. How Much of These Hills Is Gold by C Pam Zhang

How Much of These Hill Is Gold was longlisted for the Booker Prize. It also won the 2020-2021 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature in the Adult Fiction category.

Book Cover of How Much of These Hills Is Gold

Check out the print version here.

8. How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Find How to Pronounce Knife in the Featured Fiction section of Hannon Library. This novel by Souvankham Thammavongsa was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pen Open Book Award. In addition, it won the 2020 Giller Prize.

Book Cover of How to Pronounce Knife: Stories

Check out the print version here.

9. Inscrutable Belongings: Queer Asian North American Fiction by Stephen Hong Sohn

Inscrutable Belongings won the 2020 Asian American Studies Book Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Humanities and Cultural Studies: Literary Studies.

Book Cover of Inscrutable Belongings: Queer Asian North American Fiction

Hannon Library provides access to the e-book version of Inscrutable Belongings: Queer Asian North American FictionCheck it out here.

10. Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu

Charles Yu’s second novel, Interior Chinatown, won the 2020 National Book Award for Fiction. You can find it in Hannon Library’s Featured Fiction section.

Book Cover of Interior Chinatown

Check out the print version here.

11. Interpreter of Maladies: Stories by Jhumpa Lahiri

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies: Stories won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2000. Our web & discovery librarian, Thomas Dodson, said, “This collection of stories contains one of my favorites, ‘A Temporary Matter,’ about a couple falling out of love in the midst of a power outage.”

Book Cover of Interpreter of Maladies: Stories

Check out the print version here.

12. Kanaka ʻōiwi Methodologies: Moʻolelo and Metaphor edited by Katrina-Ann R. Kapāʻanaokalāokeola Nākoa Oliveira and Erin Kahunawaikaʻala Wright

According to the University of Hawaii Press, Kanaka ‘Ōiwi Methodologies: Mo’olelo and Metaphor examines “Native Hawaiian Critical Race Theory, Hawaiian traditions and protocol in environmental research, using mele(song) for program evaluation, and more.”

Book Cover of Kanaka ʻōiwi Methodologies: Moʻolelo and Metaphor

Check out the print version here.

13. Leave the World Behind: A Novel by Rumaan Alam

This novel by Rumaan Alam was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2020.

Book Cover of Leave the World Behind: A Novel

Place a hold on the print version here.

14. The Leavers by Lisa Ko

The Leavers was the winner of the 2016 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Fiction.

Book Cover of The Leavers

Check out the print version here.

15. My Year Abroad by Chang-Rae Lee

According to The New York Times Book Review, Chang-Rae Lee’s novel, My Year Abroad, is “a manifesto to happiness—the one found when you stop running from who you are.”

Book Cover of My Year Abroad

Check out the print version here.

16. No-No Boy by John Okada

According to The Atlantic, John Okada’s only published novel, No-No Boy, “may be read as a test of character, questioning the rigid binary of loyalty—yes or no—and teaching us that what makes us human and complex, what constitutes character, are all the questions and cares that exist between yes and no: ethical and political choices, our best intentions, our social and cultural being, beliefs, courage, fears, failures, and compassion.”

Book Cover of No-No Boy

Hannon Library provides access to both the e-book and print versions of No-No Boy. Access it online here, or check out the print version here.

17. Obit: Poems by Victoria Chang

Victoria Chang’s Obit: Poems was longlisted for the 2020 National Book Award in Poetry.

Book Cover of Obit: Poems

Hannon Library provides access the e-book version of Obit: Poems. Check it out here.

18. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

Pachinko was considered by The New York Times to be one of the 10 Best Books of 2017. In addition, this novel by Min Jin Lee was recommended by our campus engagement & research services librarian, Melissa Anderson.

Book Cover of Pachinko

Check out the print version here.

19. The Politics of Privacy in Contemporary Native, Latinx, and Asian American Metafictions by Colleen G. Eils

The Politics of Privacy in Contemporary Native, Latinx, and Asian American Metafictions, was recommended by our collection development librarian, Emily Miller-Francisco.

Book Cover of The Politics of Privacy in Contemporary Native, Latinx, and Asian American Metafictions

Check out the print version here.

20. Where We Once Belonged by Sia Figiel

Where We Once Belonged, the debut novel by Samoan poet and novelist Sia Figiel, won the Commonwealth Writer’s Best First Book Prize for the Southeast Asia/South Pacific region.

Book Cover of Where We Once Belonged

Check out the print version here.

 

Front of Hannon Library

All Friends of Hannon Library members are invited to join the Board of the Friends of Hannon Library for the Annual Members Meeting on April 29 at 6:00 p.m. Pacific Time. Register for the webinar here 

The Members Meeting will include a greeting from Sophia Bogle, president of the Board of the Friends of Hannon Library, and a summary of what the Friends worked on during the pandemic. Also on the agenda is an overview of next year’s Speaker Series, Cultural Connection, and votes on new bylaws and the new standing rule. The meeting will also include a report from Dale Vidmar, Hannon Library’s Interim University Librarian, and a vote to elect board members. There will be time for questions at the end of the meeting.

For any questions regarding the meeting or interest in becoming a board member, please contact Sophia Bogle at sophiaswbogle@gmail.com.

Once you register for the webinar, you will receive an email confirmation with a link to access the event. If you have not done so already, you may want to download Zoom before the event at 6:00 p.m. on April 29. If you have questions about using Zoom, please contact libraryevents@sou.edu.

 

 

Paper with fountain pen and cursive writing

April is National Poetry Month, and this year marks the 25th annual celebration of poets and poetry. This year, you can attend Poetry & the Creative Mind online and for free on April 29 at 4:30 p.m. Pacific Time for the first time. Poetry & the Creative Mind will feature actors, dancers, artists, musicians, and public figures reading favorite poetry. Register for free here

Poem in Your Pocket Day 2021 will be on Thursday, April 29. If you are out and about on April 29, you can write down or print out a poem to carry with you throughout the day. If you’d like to get involved from home, poets.org has some great ideas for how to do so, including sharing a poem on social media using the hashtag #PocketPoem. 

If you’d like more ideas for how to celebrate National Poetry Month and Poem in Your Pocket Day this year, Poets.org has amassed a collection of 30 ways to celebrate at home or online

You can continue to celebrate poets and poetry through April and beyond by checking out poetry from Hannon Library. The selection of books below includes books that are new to Hannon Library, award winners and nominees, and books about reading poetry. 

Recommended Poetry

African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle & Song edited by Kevin Young

Book Cover of African American Poetry 250 Years of Struggle and Song by Kevin Young

Check it out here.

An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo

Book Cover of An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo

Check it out here.

Ararat by Louise Glück

Book Cover of Ararat by Louise Glück

Check it out here.

DMZ Colony by Don Mee Choi

Book Cover of DMZ Colony by Don Mee Choi

Check it out here.

Furious Flower: Seeding the Future of African American Poetry edited by Joanne V. Gabbin and Lauren K. Alleyne; foreword by Rita Dove

Book Cover of Furious Flower: Seeding the Future of African American Poetry edited by Joanne V. Gabbin and Lauren K. Alleyne; foreword by Rita Dove

Check it out here.

How to Carry Water: Selected Poems of Lucille Clifton by Lucille Clifton

Book Cover of How to Carry Water: Selected Poems of Lucille Clifton by Lucille Clifton

Check it out here.

Post Colonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

Check it out here.

The Seven Ages by Louise Glück

Book Cover of The Seven Ages by Louise Glück

Check it out here.

The Tradition by Jericho Brown

Book Cover of The Tradition By Jericho Brown

Check it out here.

A Treatise on Stars by Mei-mei Berssenbrugge

Book Cover of A Treatise on Stars by Mei-mei Berssenbrugge

Check it out here.

When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through by Joy Harjo (Editor), LeAnne Howe (Executive Associate Editor), Jennifer Elise Foerster (Associate Editor)

Book Cover of When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through by Joy Harjo (Editor), LeAnne Howe (Executive Associate Editor), Jennifer Elise Foerster (Associate Editor)

 

Books About Reading Poetry

How to Read a Poem: And Fall in Love with Poetry by Edward Hirsch

Book Cover of How to Read a Poem: And Fall in Love with Poetry by Edward Hirsch

Check it out here.

The Poem Is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them by Stephanie Burt

Book Cover of The Poem Is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them by Stephanie Burt

Check it out here.

 

 

 

Library Floor Mosaic

April 4 through 10, 2021, is National Library Week, a time to highlight the essential role libraries, librarians and library workers play in transforming lives and strengthening communities. First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries of all types across the country each April. The theme for this year’s National Library Week is “Welcome to your library,” which promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building. This week, Hannon Library encourages all students, faculty, staff, community members and Friends of Hannon Library to explore and access virtual services.

Key Dates

Hannon Library invites its community to observe National Library Week and participate in celebrations throughout the week. 

  • On Monday, April 5, the State of America’s Libraries Report is released, which includes the Top Ten Frequently Challenged Books of 2020. The books are listed at the bottom of this post, and many are available at Hannon Library. 
  • Tuesday, April 6, is National Library Workers Day, a day to celebrate the dedication and service of library workers.
  • Wednesday, April 7, is National Library Outreach Day, a day to recognize library outreach and library professionals who bring services to those in need.
  • Thursday, April 8, is Take Action for Libraries Day, a day to rally advocates to support libraries.

How to Celebrate National Library Week 

  • For a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card from ALA, share what you love about Hannon Library on Instagram, Twitter, or on the I Love Libraries Facebook page. Use the hashtag #MyLibrary is, and tag Hannon Library (Instagram @SOU_Hannon, Twitter @HanLib, Facebook @HannonLibrary) between April 4 and April 10 at 10 am PT. 
  • Thank a library worker in person or on social media, or nominate a library worker for the Submit a Star program if you’d like them to be recognized by ALA. 
  • Visit Hannon Library in person (SOU staff, students, and faculty) or online at hanlib.sou.edu.
  • Try your hand at this PDF of the National Library Week Word Search, or unwind with a PDF of the National Library Week Coloring Page (Spanish | English).
  • Community members can consider becoming a Friend of Hannon Library.
  • Check out one of the Top 10 Frequently Challenged Books of 2020 from Hannon Library.

Top Ten Frequently Challenged Books of 2020

1. George by Alex Gino

George Book Cover

2. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You Book Cover

(Request a summit copy)

3. All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

All American Boys Book Cover

4. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Speak Book Cover

5. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie Book Cover

6. Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin

Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin Book Cover

7. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Book Cover

8. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Book Cover

 

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

10. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas Book Cover

 

US Capitol Building on Bright Blue Background

Hannon Library observes Freedom of Information Day by commemorating the birthday of the fourth president of the United States, James Madison, and focusing on the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Many government documents are already publicly available to view at Hannon Library and online, but the FOIA enables individuals to request access to other records from federal agencies. 

book cover for James Madison by Jeff BroadwaterThe “Father of the United States Constitution,” James Madison

Often regarded as a supporter of openness in government and public access to government information, James Madison Jr. was born on March 16, 1751. The anniversary of his birth is the reason Freedom of Information Day is celebrated on March 16 each year. For an ebook about his life, consider reading James Madison: A Son of Virginia and a Founder of the Nation by Jeff Broadwater online.

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 

Why care about the Freedom of Information Act? The FOIA promotes transparency and requires that federal government agencies share information requested under the FOIA unless it meets one of the nine exemptions permitted. If you’re interested in requesting information from a government agency, learning more about the FOIA and how to take advantage of it, consider checking out this FAQ

To dive deeper into the inner workings of the FOIA, you might consider taking a look at the Freedom of Information Act Guide online or view the physical copy at Hannon Library. This document covers details about fees and fee waivers, information about all nine exemptions, litigation considerations, and more. 

If you want to further your understanding of the more recent history of the FOIA, you can access fairly recent congressional committee hearings concerning the FOIA. Check out Ensuring Transparency Through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), a hearing before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform that took place on June 2, 2015. You can view the physical copy or take a look at it online

Another document you might be interested in is Open Government and Freedom of Information: Reinvigorating the Freedom of Information Act for the Digital Age, which details the hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary of the United States Senate that occurred on March 11, 2014. You can access this document online or in Hannon Library

You can find many other resources related to the FOIA at Hannon Library. SOU’s Hannon Library is a Federal Depository Library, so many Government Publications you may be interested in are easily accessible through our LibGuide. If you’re having trouble finding what you’re looking for, our qualified librarians can help you. To receive assistance, you can chat with a librarian during Chat Research hours or submit a message to Ask a Librarian anytime.