silhouette of pears

Sue Naumes presents “Pear Box Labels: the History of the Rogue Valley” Thursday, February 1, 2018 at 4 pm at Southern Oregon University’s Hannon Library (Meese Room). This event is free and open to the public.

Pear box labels tell the story of Southern Oregon’s agricultural history, its economic wealth and, thanks to Sue Naumes, the story of Southern Oregon.

By 1910, Southern Oregon was in the throes of a land boom, the result of commercial pear cultivation and the railroad that brought those pears to national markets. Every box of pears packed had a label on its side, a bright and colorful label that pronounced the quality of the fruit and the excellence of a Rogue Valley’s company brand.

Naumes has been collecting pear box labels for most of her adult life, and each tells the story of a Rogue Valley grower, packer or shipper. Her collection is brilliant, graphically compelling and a fascinating insight into the politics and power struggles that began at the turn of the century. She’s found labels in burned out buildings, old warehouses, on eBay, at shows and in thrift shops. Her collection is extraordinary in its comprehensiveness and beauty, and Naumes knows the story behind every label.

Thanks to a 2017 Library Services and Technology Act grant to Southern Oregon University’s Hannon Library, Naumes’ pear box labels are being digitized and will made available through the Southern Oregon Digital Archives (SODA) in the Stories of Southern Oregon collection.

Naumes’ grandparents, John Peter and Dillie Naumes, settled in the Rogue Valley in 1929 and helped start the Associated Fruit Co. and began an agricultural enterprise that would become one of the largest in Southern Oregon. Naumes, Inc. was established in 1946 as the Nye & Naumes Packing House by Naumes’ father, William Joseph “Joe” Naumes Jr. and Stephen G. Nye Jr. selling product under the NANPAK label at 619 South Grape Street in Medford, Oregon. It was the first ground level fruit packing plant in the northwest setting a new efficiency standard in fruit packing house design. David Lawry bought up Associated Fruit in 1950 and in the mid-late 1960s Joe Naumes bought out Nye’s interest. In the 1970s, Joe Naumes’ children, Mike and Sue Naumes, returned to help manage the company.

Joe Naumes died on July 4, 1989. At the time of his death, the Naumes family owned 7,000 acres of fruit and nut trees in Washington, Oregon and California and was said to be the largest producer of Bosc pears in the world. Today, Mike Naumes, Laura Ernest Naumes and their children, Joe, Cynthia and Sean manage the family enterprise.

Hannon Library’s Southern Oregon Digital Archives display 18 collections that present a rich set of images, text and video on topics that range from locally discovered Chinese material culture, butterflies, First Nations, musical instruments, wine, agriculture and more. The Southern Oregon Digital Archives can be accessed at http://soda.sou.edu.

For more information on the Feb. 1, 2018 program at Hannon Library or the Southern Oregon Digital Archives, call 541-552-6442. If you disability accommodations to participate in this event, please contact Disability Resources at 541-552-6213 or dss@sou.edu.

 

promotional sticker on black background

As the clock winds down on the term, let’s take a look back at some of the highlights from fall 2017.

Week of Welcome

Hannon Library opened up the 2017-18 academic year with its first-ever Week of Welcome Open House. New (and not-so-new) students had the opportunity to tour the building, meet librarians and library staff, partake of some free popcorn, and even get their hands on a coveted Swampy sticker.

New and Improved Services

Last year the library conducted a survey, asking students to share their thoughts about library services and resources. A lot of wonderful information came back to us, and we’ve been working hard to address students’ feedback.

One of the big changes we’re excited about are the new Chromebooks available for three-day loans. SOU students, faculty, and staff can now borrow one of these Chromebooks and take it out of the library for up to three days. Weekend studying suddenly just got easier.

We’ve introduced a Request From Shelf service, allowing patrons to request that eligible items be paged from the shelves and made ready for pick-up at Hannon or any of the three Rogue Community College campuses. We also implemented automatic renewals for books and audio-visual materials in the general circulating collection, improved Summit delivery time to 1-3 days, and reduced Inter Library Loan fees for students.

More information about these services can be found at the Circulation Services web page.

New Faces

In September, Kate Jones joined the Hannon team as the new Resource Sharing & Fulfillment Services Lead. Hailing from the UO Knight Library, Kate has been a smiling new face in the Access Services department.

And in November, we welcomed Anna Runyen on board. Anna is a part-time Research Librarian and can be found at the Research Help desk, offering her friendly assistance to the Friday and Saturday crowds.

Ashland Literary Arts Festival

In October, Hannon Library hosted the Sixth Annual Ashland Literary Arts Festival. For an entire day, the library was filled with authors, independent publishers, literature enthusiasts, and more. Eight hundred visitors came to partake of festival activities that explored everything from cook books and Wonder Woman to local history and Sufi poetry.

Pride and Culture

If you’ve been by the Special Collections & University Archives department lately, you have undoubtedly seen the ongoing series of displays featuring Native American art, writings, and research. These books and materials are just some of the cultural gems that can be found in Special Collections.

This fall, we also announced the addition of the Queer Resource Center Collection, consisting of articles written by and for the QRC, as well as archived information about past QRC programs. More info about this collection will be available on our website soon.

It’s been a busy term, but we’re just getting started. Stick with us as we get ready to ring in the New Year and take an a whole ‘nother academic term. We have lots more excitement and activity in the works, so stay tuned!

vineyard with mountains in background

Had any good wine lately? If so, you can thank the 21st Amendment for that.

On December 5, 1933, the United States Congress passed the 21st Amendment, putting an end to the Prohibition Era. Once again, Americans could buy, sell, and consume alcoholic beverage.

Now, more than eighty years later, many Oregonians have made the most of this change of heart by developing vineyards and wineries, putting our fair state on the map for quality wine. Which is why we suggest commemorating Repeal Day, not with a toast or a toddy, but with a trip to the library.

photo of vineyard overlaid with logos and title: Wine of Southern Oregon

hanlib.sou.edu/wine

Hannon Library has been documenting the history of wine production in Southern Oregon with an ever-growing collection of photographs, wine labels, books, journals, and other materials. A visit to our Special Collections department will yield hundreds of books about wine, viticulture, and enology. Or you can explore our digital collections online to see historical photos, wine labels, annual reports, and more.

Learn more about Hannon Library’s Wine and Viticulture Collection at our Special Collections website, and remember to celebrate our rights and freedoms responsibly.

Learn more about Repeal Day at www.repealday.org

mosaic floor art from library rotunda entrance

The Fall 2017  issue of the library’s BookMarks newsletter is available! Read it here, and don’t forget to subscribe for updates about future issues: Fall 2017 Issue

Included in this issue:

  • Library user survey results
  • New staff hires and appointments
  • Chromebooks available
  • Improved services

You can read the Fall 2017 issue on this blog, or subscribe to receive future issues by email. Join our e-mail list to subscribe.

graphic showing logos for Hannon Library and the Lotus Rising Project

Celebrate Pride with a good book!

The Lotus Rising Project—an organization which works comprehensively to support, inform, an reach out to LGBTQ+ people across Southern Oregon—has donated a wonderful collection of books and materials to Hannon Library.

You can see preview our Lotus Rising collection by visiting this book display on the third floor of the library. You can even browse the collection on our website at hanlib.sou.edu/lotusrising.

And don’t miss the Rogue Valley Pride parade on Saturday, October 14 in downtown Ashland, where you can see and wave to members of the SOU community as they walk in the parade!